Tag Archive | "family"

Facebook Took The Scenic Route, But Now It’s Nailing Mobile

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Facebook's Family

Nomophobia (Smartphone Dependency) Diagnostic Test – Marketing Opportunities

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Would you feel lost or uncomfortable without your smartphone? Then you may be suffering from nomophobia – fear of being without your mobile phone (no mobile phobia).

You can self-diagnose yourself for the psychological condition of nomohobia using the new NMP-Q nomophobia test below, developed by Caglar Yildirim at Iowa State University that is to be published this year in Computers in Human Behavior (full thesis).

A recent study suggests that nearly 2/3 of us (66%) suffer from nomophobia – dependency on our smartphone for our psychological wellbeing.  Some call it addiction, others call it evolution. Digital marketers call it an opportunity.

For marketers, the NMP-Q scale items reveal an interesting insight – the root psychology of this situational phobia known as nomophobia appears to be FOMOfear of missing out. Without our smartphones, we feel we may miss out on fun, love, life and fulfilment.  The smartphone is not a gadget, it is a digital umbilical chord connecting us to a fulfilled life.

The marketing implication is clear.  In a mobile-first world, mobile marketing will work best when it plays to this nomophopic fear of missing out – by deploying sites, campaigns and strategies built around ensuring people do not miss out on opportunities.

So whilst we’re all busy adapting our digital properties for Google’s new algorithm to be released next month (with its mobile dictate - be mobile-friendly or be invisible) think beyond responsive design.  Marketing success in  a mobile world means marketing to the nomophobic mobile-mindset.

Nomophobia (Smartphone Dependency) Diagnostic Test

Please indicate how much you agree or disagree with each statement in relation to your smartphone use. (1 = Strongly Disagree, 7 = Strongly Agree)

[Score a majority of 5 and above is an indication of nomophobia (smartphone dependency) – see full report for additional weightings/caveats]

  1. I would feel uncomfortable without constant access to information through my smartphone.
  2. I would be annoyed if I could not look information up on my smartphone when I wanted to do so.
  3. Being unable to get the news (e.g., happenings, weather, etc.) on my smartphone would make me nervous.
  4. I would be annoyed if I could not use my smartphone and/or its capabilities when I wanted to do so.
  5. Running out of battery in my smartphone would scare me.
  6. If I were to run out of credits or hit my monthly data limit, I would panic.
  7. If I did not have a data signal or could not connect to Wi-Fi, then I would constantly check to see if I had a signal or could find a Wi-Fi network.
  8. If I could not use my smartphone, I would be afraid of getting stranded somewhere.
  9. If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it.

If I did not have my smartphone with me,

  1. I would feel anxious because I could not instantly communicate with my family and/or friends.
  2. I would be worried because my family and/or friends could not reach me.
  3. I would feel nervous because I would not be able to receive text messages and calls.
  4. I would be anxious because I could not keep in touch with my family and/or friends.
  5. I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me.
  6. I would feel anxious because my constant connection to my family and friends would be broken.
  7. I would be nervous because I would be disconnected from my online identity.
  8. I would be uncomfortable because I could not stay up-to-date with social media and online networks.
  9. I would feel awkward because I could not check my notifications for updates from my connections and online networks.
  10. I would feel anxious because I could not check my email messages.
  11. I would feel weird because I would not know what to do.

I Beat A Patent Troll And You Can Too

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Smartspot’s Tale: From A Farm In Egypt To Building A YC Computer Vision Startup For Fitness

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smartspot-moawia

This Game Turns Google Autocomplete Into A Game Of Family Feud

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Microsoft’s Keyboard Obsession

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Old IBM keyboard.

Google Launches YouTube Kids App on iOS, Android

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YouTube Kids

Google has released its YouTube Kids app on iOS and Android devices, giving parents a family-friendly option for allowing their little ones to view videos on the popular video-sharing platform. The app has been designed with young users in mind, with a user interface containing larger images, bold icons and more.

App users can browse specifically selected family-friendly channels and video playlists across four main categories: shows, music, learning and explore. This content comes from popular networks and shows including Sesame Street, Jim Henson TV, DreamWorks TV, Talking Tom and Friends and more. New videos will be added to this highlighted programming in the future.

Users can also search for videos on particular topics, like educational tutorials or train videos, as examples. This search functionality can be turned off in the parental settings menu. Here, parents also have the ability to toggle a timer which limits a child’s screen time, turn off the app’s background music and sound effects, and more.

To make the experience even more kid-friendly, videos are presented without comments. Plus, parents can notify YouTube if a questionable video happens to make it through the app’s automated screening process.

YouTube Kids is available to download for free on the iTunes App Store and Google Play in the U.S. The app is coming soon to Kurio and nabi kids’ tablets.

Google isn’t the only company embracing younger device users. Twitter’s Vine released Vine Kids, another family-friendly video viewing platform, in late January.

Article courtesy of SocialTimes Feed

Backed By $4 Million, Bevy Debuts A Photo And Video Storage Solution The Whole Family Can Share

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Bevy Lifestyle_Hero Shot

Parent Co. Launches A Private Social Network For Families, Acquires Parenting App Notabli

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Notabli-ProductShot

Mark Zuckerberg Stresses Friendship on Facebook’s 11th Birthday

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11Years650Facebook celebrated its 11th birthday Wednesday, and co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg marked the date by reminding users that in the end, it’s all about friendship.

Zuckerberg posted:

Today is a day to celebrate friends. It’s also Facebook’s birthday, but today isn’t about celebrating us. It’s about friendship.

This sounds simple, but not often enough are we taught to celebrate friends. Growing up, we learn that homework and chores are more important and need to be done before we can spend time with friends. As adults, we’re told we’re responsible when we put our work ahead of our family and friends.

Friendship isn’t a distraction from the meaningful things in life. Friendship is what gives meaning to our lives.

Our friendships make the world work. We laugh, we cry and we learn with friends. We eat, we shop and we work with friends. And when we fight for what we believe and change the world, we do that with friends too.

As we all do our part in this journey to connect the world, it’s important to remind ourselves to celebrate what’s at the root of it all: friendship.

Thank you for being part of our community of friends. Let’s turn today into a day to celebrate a friend. #friendsday

Readers: How long have you been on Facebook?

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Article courtesy of SocialTimes Feed

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