Tag Archive | "gifts"

Top 25 Facebook apps: June 2014 — Introducing Trivia Crack

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There’s a game rocketing up the AppData charts — and leaving Facebook users addicted. Trivia Crack, a trivia game by Argentinan developer Etermax, is also known natively as Preguntados. Facebook users are getting increasingly hooked on Trivia Crack, which had 2.7 million daily active users (DAU) a month ago, but has more than doubled it since, clocking in at 6.5 DAU today.

Last month, Trivia Crack didn’t make the top 25 leaderboard, but it has jumped all the way to No. 9, in terms of Facebook DAU, as tracked by AppData. The game is also ranked No. 14 on the Facebook MAU chart.

Wondering what other games Facebook users play regularly? Check out our leaderboard below.

Rank App Category DAU Estimate
1  Candy Crush Saga Games 48,452,409
2  Farm Heroes Saga Games 20,093,917
3  Microsoft Live Utilities 14,649,732
4  Spotify EntertainmentMusic 12,672,059
5  Pet Rescue Saga Games 10,305,839
6  HTC Sense Utilities 8,602,608
7  Hay Day Games 7,864,055
8  Trivia Crack Games 6,507,731
9  Clash of Clans Games 6,459,588
10  Bing Utilities 5,546,328
11  Criminal Case Games 5,366,068
12  YouTube Video 4,880,411
13  Dragon City Games 4,822,376
14  Tinder Dating 4,758,870
15  Daily Horoscope Virtual Gifts 4,732,755
16  FarmVille 2 Games 4,576,720
17  Yahoo Misc 4,562,365
18  Top Eleven Be a Football Manager Games 4,331,848
19  Skype Utilities 4,153,203
20  Words With Friends GamesMisc 4,060,915
21  Flipboard UtilitiesNews / Social Reader 3,895,197
22  Birthday Cards Virtual Gifts 3,283,760
23  8 Ball Pool Games 3,234,063
24  Pinterest Social Network 3,227,394
25  Texas HoldEm Poker GamesGambling 3,159,762

Top 25 Facebook apps: April 2014 — YouTube gaining steam

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It’s no secret that Facebook users love watching videos on the site. YouTube’s app has grown considerably since we last measured AppData’s Facebook daily active user estimates in March.

YouTube wasn’t even on the top 25 leaderboard in March, but has vaulted all the way to 9th today, in terms of Facebook DAU. AppData’s estimates show that in the past month, YouTube’s Facebook DAU has grown 225.14 percent just in the past month.

Other than that, the chart hasn’t changed a whole lot, with King games Candy Crush Saga and Farm Heroes Saga maintaining a stranglehold on the top.

Click below to find out which apps Facebook users are addicted to.

Rank App Category DAU_ESTIMATE
1  Candy Crush Saga Games 53,052,785
2  Farm Heroes Saga Games 18,559,115
3  Microsoft Live Utilities 15,530,298
4  Spotify EntertainmentMusic 12,557,717
5  Pet Rescue Saga Games 11,297,682
6  HTC Sense Utilities 8,853,716
7  Hay Day Games 7,028,354
8  Bing Utilities 6,129,149
9  YouTube Video 5,971,263
10  Astrology Novelty & Quizzes 5,942,400
11  Yahoo Misc 5,418,262
12  Skype Utilities 5,268,439
13  Criminal Case Games 5,087,988
14  Daily Horoscope Virtual Gifts 4,640,281
15  Top Eleven Be a Football Manager Games 4,562,956
16  Clash of Clans Games 4,486,118
17  Dragon City Games 4,276,951
18  FarmVille 2 Games 4,206,137
19  برجك مع مـاغـي فـرح Novelty & Quizzes 4,198,142
20  Words With Friends GamesMisc 4,164,955
21  Pinterest Social Network 4,123,547
22  Tinder Dating 4,102,136
23  Horóscopo Diário Novelty & Quizzes 3,932,836
24  Flipboard UtilitiesNews / Social Reader 3,770,694
25  Amazon E-Commerce 3,747,006

Image courtesy of bloomua / Shutterstock.com.

Article courtesy of Inside Facebook

Top 25 Facebook apps: April 2014 — Facebook users swipe right for Tinder

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One of the apps rocketing up the AppData leaderboard makes the world more open and connected, but maybe not in quite the way Mark Zuckerberg had hoped. Tinder, a popular dating app, has grown from No. 25 on the AppData’s March Facebook daily active user leaderboard, all the way to No. 17. Tinder is also the top dating app, in terms of both Facebook DAU and MAU (monthly active user) estimates.

Other than that, the chart hasn’t changed a whole lot, with King games Candy Crush Saga and Farm Heroes Saga maintaining a stranglehold on the top.

Click below to find out which apps Facebook users are addicted to, as sorted by AppData’s daily active user estimates.

Rank App Category DAU_ESTIMATE
1  Candy Crush Saga Games 53,405,923
2  Farm Heroes Saga Games 18,876,066
3  Microsoft Live Utilities 13,598,526
4  Spotify EntertainmentMusic 11,502,631
5  Pet Rescue Saga Games 11,099,173
6  HTC Sense Utilities 8,859,923
7  Hay Day Games 7,085,165
8  Astrology Novelty & Quizzes 6,071,805
9  Bing Utilities 5,623,946
10  Yahoo Misc 5,293,892
11  Criminal Case Games 4,922,254
12  Skype Utilities 4,769,573
13  Clash of Clans Games 4,534,945
14  Top Eleven Be a Football Manager Games 4,403,853
15  Dragon City Games 4,353,373
16  برجك مع مـاغـي فـرح Novelty & Quizzes 4,296,764
17  Tinder Dating 4,218,671
18  Amazon E-Commerce 4,141,017
19  Pinterest Social Network 4,060,223
20  Words With Friends GamesMisc 4,030,175
21  FarmVille 2 Games 3,885,175
22  Horóscopo Diário Novelty & Quizzes 3,815,825
23  Daily Horoscope Virtual Gifts 3,803,449
24  Flipboard UtilitiesNews / Social Reader 3,736,797
25  8 Ball Pool Games 3,289,590

Image courtesy of Tinder’s Facebook page.

Article courtesy of Inside Facebook

Pinterest Debuts A “Gifts Feed” Featuring Only Things You Can Buy

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Pinterest publicly introduced a new Gifts feed on Wednesday that only displays “Product Pins” – pins that are enhanced with additional details, including pricing, availability and where the item can be purchased online. The announcement was made on Pinterest’s Business blog, aimed at advertisers, instead of on the company’s more widely read, consumer-facing main… Read More

Article courtesy of TechCrunch

How does Facebook affect Vegas?

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Facebook has changed the way many people communicate, but the social network has also played a hand in how people gamble. At the recent Social Gambling & Gaming Summit in Las Vegas, several game developers and land-based casino executives talked about the importance Facebook has held in growing the business.

Casinos and game developers are finding more devoted gamers (and paying customers) through Facebook — and not just at poker and slots games. As a result, some casinos are even bringing popular Facebook games such as Plants vs. Zombies (an EA title) into real-life with physical games based on the apps.

Derrick Morton, a speaker at the Social Gambling & Gaming Summit, is the CEO of FlowPlay — makers of Vegas World, a total Vegas experience that goes beyond cards and slots and allows users to work their way into upgraded suites, with jazzier outfits and invites to better parties. Vegas World has roughly 350,000 monthly active users, Morton said, and 70,000 daily active users. Morton spoke with Inside Facebook about how Facebook affects social gambling.

Inside Facebook: In terms of more social gambling in general, what does Facebook have to offer?

Derrick Morton: There’s really nothing unique to Facebook about gambling, or about social gaming, except for the social graph. The social graph allows you to have access to activities, leaderboards that show activity by day, activity by week, activity by game, people can share on their Facebook wall and compare on the leaderboard, and it’s big from a sharing point of view. That’s what Facebook is all about — sharing major milestones, jackpots and things that happen to you in the game with your friends and brag about it.

IF: Could more major land-based casinos take hold and develop Facebook games or some kind of portal where people could play their games through Facebook?

DM: Already, Caesar’s Palace runs the No. 1 casino game on Facebook, Slot-O-Mania, and they also own Bingo Blitz. So that’s two of the top Facebook games already owned by them. MGM (Grand) owns the No. 3 or 4 social casino, which is MyVegas. It does a really excellent job at connecting real-world casinos with virtual casinos. When you play MyVegas, you can get coupons or steak dinners or other things like that at an actual casino. So there’s a lot of activity already from land-based casinos entering the world of social gambling.

For us, though, what’s fun is we make about 1/3 of our revenue from people buying each other gifts and drinks inside the game. When you’re playing with someone else, you can buy a round of martinis, a round of champagne, or a round of beers for the players who are in the room with you. It improves the odds of everyone in the game temporarily.

IF: Do you feel we’ll see a little more revenue on the casino games front in 2014? Are more people starting to play casino games through Facebook?

DM: The growth curve is probably not as steep as it was a year or two ago. Industry analysts only expect it to grow about 10 to 15 percent year-over-year for the next few years. I think the last I saw was 4.4 billion by 2015.

IF: What do you see coming up in the next year for social gaming and gambling on Facebook? 

DM: I think what’s going to happen is current gambling games in the real land-based casinos are highly regulated. And because of that regulation, they’re slow to evolve. Even if you have a great idea for a new slots game, it can take you 2 to 3 years to submit that idea, the artwork, the process, to regulators to get the approval that is necessary to actually get that game in front of consumers.

In the online and social world, that can be compressed down to weeks. I expect that the evolution of social casinos will run far ahead of real casinos, just because they’re not as regulated. Hybrid games are coming out — like Fringo, that combines the elements of slots and bingo. It’s gonna take what people are familiar with and creating an entirely new game out of it.

IF: You talk about how the evolution can move a lot quicker online because there’s not much red tape to cut through. Could a land-based casino try a game online, then reverse-engineer and bring it to the real world?

DM: I think that’s totally true. You still have to go through regulators for approval, but it’s certainly easier for them to go through that A/B process and the introduction process and to test new things before they take it to the real world. Testing a new game online can cost you $50,000-$100,000. Taking a new game to regulators and getting it on the floor to find out that it’s a failure could cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions.

Readers: Do you play casino-based games on Facebook?

Top image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Article courtesy of Inside Facebook

If Instagram Isn’t Building Private Messaging, It Should Be

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Once upon a time, Instagram was a little app for sharing photos with friends and photography buffs. Its mostly public sharing model worked at that size. But now with over 150 million users, widespread awareness, and years of people following each other, users may be holding back from posting as much because they don’t want the whole world to see what they see.

That’s why it may be the right time for Instagram to launch private messaging.

That time could come as soon as December 12th when Instagram holds a press event in New York, for which it sent out invitations today with the tagline “You are invited to share a moment with Kevin Systrom and the Instagram team.” The snail-mail invite came with a woodblock printed with an Instagram on it, leading writers, including our own Jordan Crook, to speculate Instagram might launch some sort of physical printing option. photo<br />(6)” src=”http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/photo-6.png?w=365&h=576″ width=”365″ height=”576″ /></p>
<p>While that might be cute, and a nice holiday gift option, I suspect (with no inside knowledge) that Instagram is actually gearing up for the launch of private messaging, a feature that last month <a target=GigaOm’s Om Malik said ”well-placed sources” told him Instagram is preparing to release.

There are a ton of reasons this makes sense. Let’s start with why physical printing isn’t worthy of its own launch event. Last year, Instagram’s parent company, Facebook, tested a postcard service for sending paper prints of your photos to friends. It never took off and was shut down. Facebook
also launched a physical Gifts service but eventually switched to only selling virtual gift cards. It seems Facebook hasn’t physical goods to be a big enough business to support.

Meanwhile there are a slew of small startups like Postagram and CanvasPop that print Instagrams on everything from postcards to canvas
paintings. There doesn’t seem to be a ton of additional value for Instagram to add by launching its own printing service. A simpler native integration for sending photos to or buying prints from third-party services beyond its existing APIs doesn’t seem important enough to warrant its own press blitz (though it could be a small part of the show).

“Public Eyes / They’re Watching You”

So why messaging? Because Instagram has outgrown public sharing. Yes, you can set your entire profile to private so only people you approve can see everything you share, but that’s privacy with a sledgehammer rather than a scalpel.

Most people are excited to share some photos publicly and have them shown right in the feeds of whoever follows them. In fact, they tag their photos with reams of hashtags just so they show up in more places and win them the sweet sweet validation of another Instagram heart or follower. Setting their account to private would mean their more benign pics of sunsets and lattes wouldn’t get as many eyeballs.

photo (4)While Instagram’s privacy model hasn’t changed much over the years from a functionality standpoint, a lot more people see the photos you post today. There’s better native discovery of photos, a web version of your profile, and an ecosystem of third-party apps for power users. That means someone who is curious about where you are and what you are doing has a lot easier time finding your photos now.

But most importantly, Instagram just has way more users now than when some of its earliest, most loyal, and most engaged users joined. It’s gone from early tech adopters and artists to teens to mainstream young adults to even hosting a good number of parents.

Does that growth progression ring any bells? It should because Facebook similarly went from young to mainstream to your mom. And what did that cause? A chilling effect on sharing. Posting party pics, silly jokes, or snarky perspectives on the world is a lot less appealing when you
know your dad, boss, little sister, or stalker are watching.

That is a dangerous trend for Instagram. It needs people constantly sharing photos to fill its feed so other people check it, are delighted…and see its new ads. Less sharing = less happiness/revenue.

Meanwhile, there are plenty of apps happy to help you share photos privately. Snapchat is building a powerhouse social network on the concept of private sharing. It doesn’t matter who joins Snapchat, as the only people who see your photos and videos are the ones you send them to. Then there’s a ton of international messaging apps like WeChat, WhatsApp, KakaoTalk, and Line where people can share their precious moments privately.

Perhaps if Facebook’s bid to acquire Snapchat was successful, it could use that as its private photo-sharing play. But it got rejected, and so the burden falls on Instagram.

I’d imagine Instagram messaging could fit in the top left of the app, or be worked into the existing Activity tab alongside tags and likes. Anyone you follow would be eligible to send you messages, and group messaging would be allowed. Threads would typically start with a photo and caption, and permit both photo and text replies to let people have a conversation around the moments they’re sharing. Messages could also be a private back channel for discussing photos shared publicly.

Done right, private photo sharing could be a huge win for Instagram.

4 Reasons Instagram Needs Messages

1. Boxing Out Competitors

Most people who have Snapchat probably have Instagram, too, and more of their friends are probably also on Instagram. Its size suddenly goes from a liability to an asset with private messaging.

2. Notifications

Today if your best friend shares a photo on Instagram, you might not even know. There’s no notification sent. And since Instagram is an unfiltered feed like Twitter, it has the same issue where your favorite people can get drowned out by some shutter-happy person you followed but don’t even know. You might be missing some of Instagram’s most relevant content. Without the constant stream of
notifications like on Facebook, it’s easy to forget to even visit Instagram. I sometimes go weeks without checking as there’s nothing there addressed specifically to me to demand my attention.

But with Instagram messaging private sharing, you can be damn sure I’d open any photo sent to me. And after that, I’d probably browse my feed, get a few more smiles, and maybe see some ads. Instagram Messages could re-engage tuned-out users.

3. Growth

Messages could drive sign-ups for Instagram. You can already share a photo via email but then the engagement happens outside of Instagram in a decidedly crusty old medium. If I could privately message people by phone number (the identity basis for most modern messaging apps), I might lure my friends into signing up for Instagram.

4. Intimate Sharing

Private messaging could get people sharing a whole new category of photos and videos on Instagram. Intimate ones.

photo (5)I’m not just talking about sexy ones (though who couldn’t benefit from some blur and filters to touch up their birthday suit or flirtatious smile). I mean the other stuff people currently share on Snapchat. Funny faces. Inside jokes. Lighthearted insults. Controversial or illegal activities. Flawed portraits. Random glimpses into their current scene.

These are all things you probably wouldn’t want to share with everyone, and wouldn’t want permanently associated with your profile. They don’t necessarily need to be able to disappear like Snapchats (though
maybe that’d be useful), but having them buried in conversation threads would probably be enough privacy by obscurity.

In a world where you get made fun of for sharing selfies, but people do it anyway, it seems clear that the world’s most beloved photo app gives a way to share on the down low. It’d certainly keep some of the photos that appear in this post from ending up on a blog somewhere.

Instagram messaging could also turn the app into a true visual communication medium — one where people use it as a sort of replacement for text. Getting people constantly sending photos and
captions back and forth over Instagram could rack up more engagement in a single conversation than the social network side of that app sees in a week.

Right now, conversation on Instagram is restricted to its messy, unthreaded comment system. And like the chilling effect on the photos in the first place, I’m often apprehensive to share a comment publicly, especially if I only really care if the person who shot the photo saw it. I’d often be inclined to message them directly, but currently have to resort to text or Facebook message. Messaging would fix that.

Maybe I’m drinking my own Kool-Aid but this seems like a wise move to make, and sooner rather than later. Sure, it would bloat Instagram a bit, making it less clear what the purpose of the once-lean app is. It might cannibalize some photos from the feed, though they might inspire more return visits and engagement as private messages. It could be seen, like Poke, as another desperate attempt by Facebook to compete with Snapchat. And it could flop, becoming a rarely used extra communication channel we’re loathe to check. But I don’t think those are big enough concerns to dissuade Instagram.

The company’s mission is “to capture and share the world’s moments.” But right now it’s only broadcasting them.

Article courtesy of TechCrunch

Gilt Founder’s New Wedding Registry Startup Zola Raises $3.25M From Thrive Capital

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Zola, the new wedding registry startup emerging from Gilt And AlleyCorp founder Kevin Ryan and a group of former Gilt employees, has raised $3.25 million in Series A funding led by Thrive Capital. Joshua Kushner, founder and managing partner of Thrive Capital, will join Zola’s Board of Directors. Ryan, who led the seed funding for the startup, is also contributing to the A round, we are told.

Zola, led by former Gilt employees, Shan-Lyn Ma and Nobu Nakaguchi; is trying to reimagine the wedding registries for couples. It’s part content, part Pinterest-like inspiration sharing, and part wish list/registry. The result is a well-designed. easy to use wedding registry that tells a story of a couple.

When you visit the site and sign up for a Zola wedding registry, you can do some of the same things you would do with your wedding website, including designing a home page with a customized URL, photos, and more. The design of the registry homepage is highly customizable, or you can choose to use some of the stock photography that Gilt provides. You can then create collections of different types of categories you want to set up in your registry, including kitchen, food, experiences, honeymoon, furniture and more. You could even create a cash fund to buy a home and accept donations. The user experience is strikingly similar to creating a board on Pinterest, except you are adding items from Zola.

Within each collection, Zola allows you to simply add items from categories of products to collections. So if you were registering for kitchen items, you could add an array of utensils, china, glassware, kitchen tools, gadgets and more (including those from brands like Cuisinart or Le Creuset). Zola partially operates as an e-commerce site, as they are sourcing all the products from the brands themselves.

Of course, you won’t find the kind of selection of home goods you would on a Bloomingdale’s, or Macys.com, but Zola has ambitions to carry and add more inventory (the site currently lists about 1,000 items to register/buy). Plus Zola allows you to add additional items to your registry that you wouldn’t find at a traditional store, such as cooking classes, music lessons, gift certificates to KitchenSurfing, bicycles, massages and more.

You can also denote certain objects to be items that groups can buy, or to which individuals could contribute a portion of the purchase price. This is especially useful to high-priced products like furniture. And couples using Zola have the ability to control shipping times, with the site notifying couples when items have been purchased and allows them to receive the gifts immediately or at a later date.

There are a number of others aiming to disrupt the wedding registry space, including RegistryLove, but Gilt has an experienced team with an eye for design and ease of use.

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Article courtesy of TechCrunch

Facebook gifts Gifts center a facelift

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Facebook is working hard to make Gifts a viable e-commerce platform. As new brands are regularly added to the program, Facebook pushes Gifts whenever a friend has a birthday (or, on old News Feed, when good news is shared). Sister site AllFacebook noticed Tuesday that the main hub site for Facebook gifts has undergone a renovation.

With this aesthetic shift, Facebook has made Gifts a little more user-friendly. Now, when a person wants to send a Facebook gift to a friend via a birthday notification (or searches for Facebook Gifts in the search bar), Facebook takes the user to a page instead of a hover box. Now, users can search for gifts on a separate page with deeper features.

Facebook has been testing introducing Gifts to users in several ways. In the older News Feed, a prompt to purchase a gift for a friend would appear on a post with good news, such as the birth of a child or a new job. Now, Facebook suggests that you buy a gift for someone whenever they have a birthday.

If users are wondering which gift is best for their friends, this new design solves this. If a user clicks Fandango or Target, it will show which of their friends have liked that brand. If a user clicks on the birthday notification, it will suggest gifts for their friend based on what they’ve liked. Users can also search for certain products through a search bar.

The new design also notes whether this is available on the Facebook Card or if it’s just a digital gift.

Readers: Does this new design make you more or less likely to purchase a Facebook gift?

GiftsRedesignedDominos

Article courtesy of Inside Facebook

Regifted: No more physical products in Facebook Gifts; focus shifts to Facebook Card gift cards

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One of the main reasons behind the explosion of the gift-card industry is how easy it makes the process from both ends: The gift giver avoids the process of traveling to stores, choosing gifts, transporting them, wrapping them, and making sure they get to recipients; recipients, in turn, can choose exactly what they want to spend the amount of the card on, and they are spared the hassle of returning unwanted gifts. Logistical reasons also fueled Facebook’s decision to scrap physical gifts from its Gifts offering and shift its focus to its own gift card, the Facebook Card.

Facebook confirmed a report in AllThingsD that it will gradually shift its Gifts offering to only digital gifts and gift cards, telling AllThingsD that 80 percent of Gifts sent via the social network were already digital, anyway.

Lee Linden, who oversees the Gifts feature for Facebook, told AllThingsD in an interview:

We’re really making the decision based on user feedback. The physical stuff is interesting for sure, but our goal is to build stuff that’s really great for the majority of people who are using it.

Physical gifts do require more work to maintain, and if fewer than 20 percent of users are taking advantage of it — the purpose of this redesign is to double down on what people want.

Facebook began rolling out Gifts in September 2012, and the feature was made available to all U.S. users in December of that year. The Facebook Card, meanwhile, was introduced in January.

The Facebook Card allows users to pick the retail partner and amount, and recipients then receive gift cards via mail to the chosen retailer.

Facebook told AllThingsD that 10 percent of its users will be converted to Facebook Card-only Gifts Friday, with the remainder being switched over next week.

Readers: Was this a wise move by Facebook?

Article courtesy of Inside Facebook

Canadians are the most active Facebook users in the world

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More than one-half of Canadians log onto Facebook at least once per month — that’s 19 million of them. About 14 million of those check their News Feeds daily. And 9.4 million use mobile phones or tablets to surf the social network.

Facebook recently released its Canada-specific stats, once again showing that the nation leads the world in online social networking. On average, 61 percent of global users check Facebook at least once a day. In the U.S. 70 percent of them do. In Canada, it’s 74 percent.

A lot of that is driven by portable technologies. Even though more people own desktop computers, Facebook’s mobile usage in Canada has now far surpassed that from desktops. Jordan Banks, managing director of Facebook Canada, told The Loop:

Mobile is a rocket ship … if you look at interactions per day, people are way more engaged on mobile devices than desktop devices.

Back in the day (well, not that far back), people used to hop online before work or when they got home in the evening. With the advent of smartphones and tablets, they can check in while they’re at work (don’t tell the boss) or stuck in rush hour. For a lot of people, that adds up to several times morning to night.

Facebook released the stats to prove to advertisers that social ads are a worthy investment. Advertisers want an audience that comes back time and again. Facebook offers that and personalized target marketing in a way and with a reach that traditional and broadcast media can’t match.

Sure, we’ve all seen the upswing in complaints about the beefed-up presence of ads on the social network, but usage hasn’t dropped off. For the record, about one in 20 posts are sponsored.

So what are Canadians into on Facebook? Apparently, white rappers, coffee and donuts, and deli sandwiches. The pages with the most Canadian likes are:

The top brands by likes are:

This isn’t the first time Canada has come out ahead of the pack in terms of social media. An assessment a couple of years ago yielded similar results. No one’s quite been able to explain why, though.

Readers: Do you have any theories as to why Facebook users in Canada are so active on the social network?

Article courtesy of Inside Facebook

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